Nicholas Moore

Nicholas Moore (1918–1986), the son of the Cambridge philosopher, G.E. Moore, came to prominence during the 1940s. In that decade
he published seven full collections of poems and two pamphlets, some under pseudonyms. In 1945, Moore won international acclaim when
W.H. Auden awarded him Contemporary Poetry’s Patron Prize for his poem “Girl with a Wine Glass.” Two years later, Poetry (Chicago) awarded him their Harriet Monroe Memorial Prize. In 1950 came Recollections of the Gala, subtitled Selected Poems, 1943–48, which many think his finest collection.

But after its publication Moore disappeared from view. Although he did not stop writing, no further full-length collection was comercially published before his death in 1986, by which time he was virtually forgotten. Nevertheless, John Ashbery, Peter Riley, Anthony Rudolf, and John Hartley Williams, are among those who have spoken up for Moore’s work, and Shoestring Press’s Selected Poems, which is chosen from all periods of the poet’s life and includes work previously unpublished, will assuredly bring him new admirers.